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Bruce Pipes

Below are some recent images. All my images can be seen on my personal website.

 

CLICK ON AN IMAGE TO VIEW IT AT HIGHER RESOLUTION. 

 

NGC 5746 and NGC5740

The edge-on spiral on the upper left, NGC 5746, and the almost face-on spiral on the lower right, NGC5740, are both about 95 million light-years away in the constellation, Virgo. NGC 5746 bears a close resemblance to NGC 4565, including the squarish central bulge caused by a bar being seen from the side. It is a rather large galaxy with a diameter of 162,000 light -years, about 30% larger than the Milky Way. The two galaxies are probably interacting gravitationally, but the interaction is too weak to cause any noticeable distortion. The small, distant galaxy below and to the right of NGC 5740 is NGC 5738. There are a number of small, faint background galaxies in this image.

 

Telescope: Meade 8" LX200R @ f/7 with an Astro-Physics 0.67X telecompressor

Camera: SBIG ST-8300C

Autoguiding: Starlight Xpress OAG with Meade DSI using PHD2

Exposure: 19 X 15 minutes = 4.75 hrs



:: Thu 06/05/2014 @ 12:05
  

Supernova in Messier 106

Designated as SN 2014bc, this supernova was discovered by PanSTARRS on May 21, 2014. This image was taken on May 25. The supernova is very near the core of M106 and had a magnitude of 13.5 when discovered. Spectroscopic studies by Virtual Telescope show it to be a Type II supernova. Such a supernova results from the collapse and explosion of a very massive star in its final stage of development.

 

Telescope: Meade 8" LX200R @ f/7 with an Astro-Physics 0.67X telecompressor

Camera: SBIG ST-8300C

Autoguiding: Starlight Xpress OAG with Meade DSI using PHD2

Exposure: 10 X 15 minutes = 2.5 hrs



:: Wed 05/28/2014 @ 08:22
  

Messier 99

About 50 million light-years away in the constellation, Coma Berenices, the extended spiral arm indicates that this galaxy has been disrupted by interactions with something. Given that a large cloud of neutral hydrogen, named VIRGOHI21, was discovered in 2005 just to the northwest of M99 (just off the top right of the image), there are two conjectures. One is that VIRGOHI21 is a "dark" galaxy, a region of hydrogen in which no stars have yet formed, and that this "dark" galaxy is interacting gravitationally with M99. The other conjecture is that another galaxy, NGC 4192, had a high velocity collision with M99 and that VIRGOHI21 is part of a tidal stream pulled from M99. There are indications of a tidal stream of neutral hydrogen extending to the norhwest of M99 toward VIRGOHI21. M99 is not a starburst galaxy, but a close look reveals red clouds of star-forming hydrogen gas.

 

Telescope: Meade 8" LX200R @ f/7 with an Astro-Physics 0.67X telecompressor

Camera: SBIG ST-8300C

Autoguiding: Starlight Xpress OAG with Meade DSI using PHD2

Exposure: 20 X 15 minutes = 5 hrs



:: Wed 05/28/2014 @ 08:22
  

Messier 83

This spectacular barred spiral galaxy, also know as the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy, is 15 million light-years away in the constellation, Hydra. It is bright enough to be visible with binoculars and was first seen in 1752 by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille at the Cape of Good Hope. The blue and red regions indicate large numbers of young, hot stars and hydrogen gas where new stars are forming, respectively.

 

Telescope: Meade 14" LX200GPS @ f/7 with Starizona SCT corrector

Camera: SBIG ST-8300C

Autoguiding: Starlight Xpress OAG with Meade DSI using PHD2

Exposure: 6 X 30 minutes = 3 hrs



:: Wed 05/28/2014 @ 08:22
  

Messier 91

This barred spiral galaxy, a member of the Virgo cluster of galaxies, is about 63 million light-years away in the constellation, Coma Berenices. Discovered in 1781 by Charles Messier, it was inadvertently omitted from Messier’s catalog until 1969, when an amateur astronomer noticed that it was the same galaxy as NGC 4548 , which had been listed in William Herschel’s catalog. At magnitude 11 it is the faintest object in Messier’s catalog.

 

Telescope: Meade 14" LX200GPS @ f/7 with Starizona SCT corrector

Camera: SBIG ST-8300C

Autoguiding: Starlight Xpress OAG with Meade DSI using PHD2

Exposure: 12 X 30 minutes = 6 hrs



:: Wed 05/28/2014 @ 08:22
  

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